Viewings Rooms

ALL GOOD AND MAKE BELIEVE

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK

For his first solo exhibition in Paris, British artist George Morton-Clark unveils a series of new works. They show the artist’s favourite characters, as well as his unmistakeable style: Donald Duck, Mickey Mouse, and Bart Simpson seem to be drafts, but a closer study reveals careful work on the lines, movement and the dissolution of the character. Visitors will also be able to admire a selection of sculptures showing the artist’s exploration of a new medium. 

Passionate about animation and drawing, he began to study animation at Surrey Institute of Art and Design. He soon realised that the traditional manner of creating cartoons was shifting towards the digital medium, and decided to study fine arts instead. The result is unparalleled: with his cartoon characters that resemble sketches of cartoon drawings, George Morton-Clark provokes a range of emotions and suddenly thrusts us back into childhood. Here, Garfield, Pluto, and the Pink Panther are depicted with the same features as in the cartoons, but they have a new vitality.

George Morton-Clark explores the world he creates beyond our childhood by giving these characters a new look. While his works may emphasise the darkest aspects of today’s society, they gather and unite viewers by taking them back to the jubilation of childhood.

Eternity Gallery is delighted to introduce the artist to a Parisian audience in this solo show that presents new works, as well as the artist’s very first sculptures.

The two sculptures All Good and Make Believe and Last Orders are concrete models of  Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse. I chose these two characters for their iconic imagery.

When I was traveling around Greece as a 19 year-old  I noticed that many of the concrete buildings looked like they were unfinished and you could still see the iron rods sticking out from the roof tops. I later found out this was for tax purposes. I thought at the time that in some way this would be a good concept to use in a sculpture.  The concrete and iron rods have an architectural relationship with each other.

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
All Good And Make Believe, 2020
Concrete
70 x 80 x 60 cm
27.6 x 31.5 x 23.6 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
Last Orders, 2020
Concrete
68 x 45 x 44 cm
26.8 x 17.7 x 17.3 in

Fast forward nearly 20 years and when I was designing the sculptures I thought the concrete with the rusted iron bars would be perfect for the aesthetics and facilitate in the design. The idea of having these very bright 20th century icons made into pseudo Greek, Brutalist, industrial sculptures, which contrasts well.  The concrete and the movement makes them seem as if they are frozen, and stuck in time. The iron bars lend themselves well to the sculpture and the extension of the movement and decay I wanted to create. 

I named them slightly tongue-in-cheek.  Last Orders, because it looks like Mickey is rushing to the bar before closing time, and All Good and Make Believe, because I wanted to satirise the world at this moment.

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
I’ve Abandoned Myself, 2020
Oil, spray paint and charcoal on canvas
170 x 150 cm
66.9 x 59.1 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
Bad Donald, 2020
Charcoal on canvas
120 x 150 cm
47.2 x 59.1 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
Bad Mickey, 2020
Charcoal on canvas
120 x 150 cm
47.25 x 59.05 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
4.30am Riser, 2020
Charcoal, oil and spray paint on canvas
115 x 85 cm
45.3 x 33.5 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
Can’t Find a Good Sharpie, 2020
Charcoal, oil and spray paint on canvas
150 x 102 cm
59.1 x 40.2 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
Pink Penny, 2020
Charcoal and dye on canvas
170 x 150 cm
66.9 x 59.1 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
Looking For That Market, 2020
Charcoal, oil and spray paint on canvas
105 x 85 cm
41.3 x 33.5 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
Untrustworthy, 2020
Charcoal, oil and spray paint on canvas
105 x 85 cm
41.3 x 33.5 in

GEORGE MORTON-CLARK
Last Dandelion Of The Season, 2020
Charcoal, oil and spray paint on canvas
115 x 85 cm
45.3 x 33.5 in